The Unexamined Life..Of Your Coffee Table

I love to explore, I like to plan a whole day in a new place, it gives me a new perspective to return home with. Traveling has been an influence on everything in my home. Experiences bring my imagination to life and I love to daydream about all the possibilities.

I try to make the best of what I have to work with, in part out of care for our environment but also because every object has potential!

So in cultivating my blog over the years I’ve been exploring avenues that I enjoy. Some of the most exciting experiences I’ve had in my life I’ve been completely terrified of. Example: every single place we traveled in California had to be on the side of a mountain, and I am not a fan of heights. Am I glad I did them, yes. Was it terrifying, also yes! College, scary, did that too. Living with other people I didn’t know, scary, did that. Running for a town political role, suuuper scary but also exciting! Buying a home, scary, but extremely rewarding!

So what I’ve been doing lately has been designing a business. Im terrified. I really don’t like change. I have a pretty cushy job, and a pretty easy life. What business do I have trying to mix that up? Well the goal has been to step out of my comfort zone, to give the world a chance to understand what it is I want to give back to it and to try to live my best life!

So here it goes…

Background: I grew up an only child. Which requires me to answer the question, how did you like being an only child? I’ll be honest, it was fine. I pretty much had my imagination to entertain me, instead of another human. I think it also made me look closer at myself (critically) and also the relationship I had with other people. My fatal flaw is people -pleasing. While my parents were older from start, I had to grow up relatively quickly, with a few challenges. Mom had mental health issues, Dad had some workaholic issues. Everyone has issues, but it made my story, and shaped a lot of my strengths.

Neither parent really cared about our living space outside of whether it was clean(it was very dysfunctional). So I found myself making my bed, fluffing my stuffed animals and putting my own decorative towels in the bathroom for when guests came over. Right… I know, people pleaser. They didn’t see the value of a well designed home space. They did have some taste (sort of) Dad was kind of hippy, which now in the era of mid century modern times has found its way back in vogue (go Dad). Mom was more artist, mixed with Greek iconography. So my house was a shmorgusboard if hippy, Jesus and artwork. Not the most cute assembly of furniture pairing. Lots of random paint splatters, brushes and equipment… but it was home.

What I found myself doing in my younger years was constantly reorganizing my own space. My room was like my safe place. The family didn’t always get along, and life wasn’t always roses and sunshine. I tried to stay positive, keep my own space in order and looking as good as I could have it with the resources I had. I remember the feeling of seeing the redesigned space. It was like a breath of fresh air. The odd thing was remembering where everything was placed in the new arrangement. It was necessary to use what I had to work with because asking for something deemed “unnecessary” was more aggravating than making the best of it. In a lot of ways this allowed me to utilize the things I had creatively. I credit the rents with giving me a hard time enough that I had no choice but to make my own designs.

So here I am adulting and trying to find my purpose, and recycle, and drink enough water, and meet my personal goals, you know, be responsible (eye rolling emoji). What I’ve found is that I really want to help people live in the space they feel the most at home. Some people see the value in simplicity while others want their Pinterest dreams to come true. I’ve just found a happy balance of function and artsy, with unique hand made peices. What I’ve always wanted is my space to feel comfortable to anyone who enters. After years of trial and error I think I’ve achieved my design goals.

What is so counter intuitive to so many of my friends and family is making their space work for their family while still meeting their asthetic goals. I’ve always loved Martha Stewart, and I’m a huge fan of HGTV. The difference between my inspirations is that I try to incorporate personal experiences into spaces.

So many designers make your kitchen look like a home and garden magazine but fail to reflect the people who live there. One thing I love is holding the mirror up and saying you are, where you live. Your space is part of your health. Your wellness is directly related to your environment, and for me, I find clarity in order, and reorganization.

Part of the journey I am on in life is bringing my life experiences into my living space, as a reflection of who I am, where I’ve been and what I love.

I have so many photographs of my better half, Joe and I. I have pictures of our cat. I have my mothers artwork, our grandparents wedding photographs, friends, family, trips we’ve been on etc. Our kitchen has been completely redone (by us), and is now pig themed, subtly. before

(Two different times of year so bare with the decor in these pictures)

Our chandelier is restored from basically a dumpster to full beauty (Joe deemed it to be trash).

We built our own bar, we built our headboard, our kitchen island, our entry bench, our master bedroom bench. We redesigned our bathroom fixture. We built custom shelving, we built our ottoman, we’ve upcycled more stuff than we’ve bought. I’m proud of that.

Everything in our home has a story, and it’s about who we are and what we love.

We have made a beautiful space using mostly what we had, and adding our own spin. Our molding may not have perfect lines, although he did a very nice job for a beginner! Our life might not be exactly what you see in a magazine but it has cracks that came with weathering. My favorite part about our home is our life in it. After so many life experiences it’s easy to lose track of where you’ve been. I find a memory around every corner in the lake house that we love.

So I am officially beginning the exciting (and scary as hell) adventure of starting a consulting company for interior decorating, with a focus on life experience, and functional needs. I love to be reminded of all the fun I’ve had. I love my family, and my friends and I make it a point to focus on the positivity both in my life and in my home space. I have helped so many people see positivity and opportunities in their space so they can grow into it or shift into a better arrangement.

As for the coffee table, we turned it into an ottoman.

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Romantic Night Stands (DIY)

I wanted end tables with blue and white romantic print.
So I found some romantic print fabric at a consignment shop for $5.00 and decided to make them with decoupage.

I bought these night stands which look like they were attached to a mirror or to a headboard previously. The two together were about $30. Solid wood, with nice but subtle detail, these pieces were going to be our night stands.

 This sad end table had all the integrity but none of the flare… So I fixed that.  Admittedly they weren’t much to look at.

  1.  First I painted them 2 coats with behr oatmeal paint so it was a creamy antique look. 
  2. I painted the drawers as well and added knobs. There were no knobs originally, on the drawers. I just bought 4 individual knobs from Home Depot, in a nickel finish. They looked like hammered nickel which was the look I wanted, and they were about $5 each.
      As you can see there were a few cracks but I liked it that way. I wanted a romantic, distressed look. I even took a sanding block and gently sanded the trim peices and around the edges to give it more a more weathered look.
  3. Probably the most difficult part was getting the fabric attached. I say difficult because you have to be very particular when cutting it. So I started by painting a layer of decoupage on the top of the end table. I then placed the whole peice of fabric on top. I’m glad I did this, because had I cut it prior, I probably would have wasted a lot of fabric.

After placing the fabric on the decoupaged top I smoothed it down, making sure it was straight and also that it showed the peice of the fabric that I wanted.

Making sure there were no bubbles or creases I took the decoupage and painted a layer on top of the fabric. I waited (maybe) 10 minutes, then took an exact o knife and carefully followed the ridge at the top. I was very careful not to pull the fabric as this would cause bubbles etc.  After tracing out the fabric it looked perfect but a little tattered. Decoupage is like a glue that dries clear and instead of potentially compromising the fabric or pulling a thread, I decoupaged the corners and pushed down with the brush so as to guide these frays in line.

Then I added a second coat of decoupage and let it dry overnight.

Finally my end table was complete. I later added legs to the bottom because it was a bit short.

I was pleased with the final product it was exactly what I wanted…

I’ve come to realize that when you know what you want the only way to get it is to create it. When you build something, you give yourself exactly what you want. What is more satisfying?

Happy Building!

A Kitchen Island (DIY)

When we moved into the new condo we had a god awful 80’s kitchen with the white particle board cabinets, yes it had the wood trim. It was hainus. After a full remodel I realized we had an L shaped kitchen which needed to be grounded. We  renovated the kitchen on a budget, and so the island wasn’t in it.
I found a 36 in tall dresser. It was a sad peice and unfortunately I didn’t take the before picture. It was your standard wood dresser it was 34 inches wide which was perfect! I wanted to put butcher block on top but unfortunately the cheapest version would be $200.

I bought the dresser for $25. I painted it with Benjamin Moore “storm”, which was a semi blue grey.

  I attached 2 peices of would I found in the garage and sanded them down so it had the look of butcher block without the price tag. I sanded them well and stained them with Minwax natural stain.

I then attached a peice of wood to the bottom of the dresser so that it was all flat. I needed to have a flat bottom to attach the wheels properly.

The wheels were $4.00. I would suggest wheels with built in stoppers so that when you pull out a drawer it doesn’t wiggle the whole peice.

  We had beedboard leftover from our bathroom update so I simply cut two peices to fit and nailed them into place. I later caulked the seem at the top and down the side where the two peices of beedboard meet so it looked seemless.

I painted the beedboard the same white as the cabinets, Benjamin Moore “chalk”. It was an eggshell finish.


Finally I attached these pretty knobs so it gave it a little Moroccan flare. I bought these at home goods for $4.00 for 4 so it was $8.00 total.

After it was completed:


It was perfect!!! It was a charming rustic touch and the total cost was $41.00, but I also had some of the materials. If I were to estimate the cost having none of the materials in advance. It would probably be closer to $100. I was pleased with the turn out. I later attached hooks to the side closest to the refrigerator for towels and spatulas and thing of that nature. I put the trash can below the longer wood end so when I cut up vegetables I sweep them right into the trash.

Another tip: make sure after a few days to polyurethane the top of the wood so that water marks and stains don’t compromise the wood.

It’s not butcher block but it’s still pretty!! A word of advice for those of you that don’t know, butcher block is not as susceptible water, germs etc because of the density of the wood. The propose of butcher block would be in lieu of a cutting board. This material is not meant for cutting directly on but it’s astetics make for a soft warm grounding in this L shaped kitchen.